About Sri Lankan Elephents

A subspecies of the Asian elephant known as the Sri Lankan elephant (Elephas maximus Maximus) is found only in Sri Lanka. Elephas maximus has been classified as endangered by the IUCN since 1986 because the population has decreased by at least 50% over the last three generations, which are believed to be between 60 and 75 years old. It is largely threatened by the loss, degradation, and fragmentation of its habitat.

Carl Linnaeus first characterized the Asian elephant as Elephas maximus in 1758, giving it the scientific name Elephas maximus Maximus.

They can be found mostly in the north, east, and southeast of Sri Lanka, where there is a big concentration of elephants. It is possible to see elephants in a variety of protected locations like Udawalawe, Yala, Wilpattu, Lunugamvehera, and Minneriya National Parks as well as in the wild. In Asia, Sri Lanka is thought to have the highest concentration of elephants on the continent. The conflict between humans and elephants is on the rise as elephant habitat is converted to human settlements and permanent farming.

“A subspecies of the Asian elephant known as the Sri Lankan elephant is found only in Sri Lanka. Elephas maximus Maximus has been classified as endangered by the IUCN since 1986. It is largely threatened by the loss, degradation, and fragmentation of its habitat. In Asia, Sri Lanka is thought to have the highest concentration of elephants in the continent.”

Characteristics

Most Asian elephants weigh less than African elephants, and their heads are the tallest. There is a finger-like process on the tip of their trunk. They have a convex or flat backside. In general, females tend to be smaller than their male counterparts. Males with tusks can be found.

Between 2 and 3.5 meters (6.6 and 11.5 feet) tall and between 2,000 and 5,500 kilograms (4,400 and 12,100 lb), Sri Lankan elephants are the largest subspecies. They have 19 ribs. On the ears, face, trunk, and belly they have greater patches of depigmentation that are darker than those on the indicus and sumatranus.  Only 7% of males are born with tusks. The tusks of an adult elephant can measure up to six feet in length. It can be as heavy as 35 kilograms (77 lb). The tusks of Raja (elephant) were discovered to be the longest (1913 – 16 July 1988)

Analyses of allozyme loci but not of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences provide only limited support for the Sri Lankan subspecies’ identification.It was spotted in Udawalawe National Park in July 2013 by a Sri Lankan elephant dwarf. Despite its height, it had shorter legs than other bulls and was the primary aggressor in a fight with another bull.

“Sri Lankan elephants are the largest subspecies of elephants. They have 19 ribs, a convex or flat backside, and a finger-like process on the tip of their trunk. Only 7% of male elephants are born with tusks. Sri Lankan elephant dwarf was spotted in Udawalawe National Park in July 2013.”

Habitat and Geographic Range

There are still large populations of elephants in Sri Lanka’s dry zone in the north, south, and eastern parts of the country, as well as in north-western, north-central, and south-eastern Sri Lanka. The Peak Wilderness Sanctuary is home to a small remnant population. The country’s humid zone is devoid of them. Only Wilpattu and Ruhuna National Parks are larger than 1,000 square kilometers (390 square miles). It is difficult for elephants to cover their complete home ranges in many locations that are less than 50 km2 (19 sq mi). For elephants, the Mahaweli Development Area now includes 1,172 square kilometers (453 square miles) of contiguous habitat thanks to the linking of several national parks and nature reserves, including Wasgomuwa National Park, the Flood Plains National Park, the Somawathiya National Park, and the Trikonamadu Nature Reserve. The elephant’s range does, however, expand outside the boundaries of designated protected areas in roughly 65% of the total.

“The Mahaweli Development Area includes 1,172 square kilometers of contiguous habitat for elephants thanks to the linking of several national parks and nature reserves. Only Wilpattu and Ruhuna National Parks are larger than 1,000 square kilometers (390 square miles). The elephant’s range does expand outside the boundaries of designated protected areas in 65% of the total. The Peak Wilderness Sanctuary is home to a small remnant population.”

How Many Elephants Available in Sri Lanka?

There are an estimated 7,500 wild elephants in Sri Lanka. Killing them is illegal, but the animals often come into conflict with rural communities. Elephants are revered in Sri Lanka but some farmers view them as pests according to BBC.

Best Places to Stay

For those who plan a trip to Sri Lanka, we recommend booking your accommodations through our partner ” Booking.com,” which allows us to earn a portion of the revenue generated by your booking which helps us to the creation of high-quality content like this. Even if you are unwilling to do so, you can still enjoy the article and learn something you may not have known before.

Booking.com

Where to Find A Professional

If you want to book our Travel professional for your trip, then please see what is available for you from Share Traveller Travel Professionals. Hope our experienced travel professionals make your life comfortable with minimal cost. Let’s experience a new dimension of the Travel Industry.

Comments

  • 123movies
    Reply

    I am extremely impressed with your writing skills as well as with the layout on your blog. Caresse Cullen Izaak

  • yabanci diziler
    Reply

    Pretty nice post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wished to say that I have really enjoyed surfing around your blog posts. In any case I will be subscribing to your rss feed and I hope you write again soon! Roby Filberto Lumbard

  • yabanci
    Reply

    Great article! That is the type of information that should be shared across the web. Lisette Hasty Ribble

  • hindi movie
    Reply

    Having read this I thought it was rather enlightening. Cassandry Dennet Bucella

  • torrent
    Reply

    There is apparently a bundle to know about this. I suppose you made certain good points in features also. Simonne Kirk Gare Elisa Patrizius Danielle

  • bedava
    Reply

    Excellent article. I certainly love this site. Continue the good work! Alameda Lukas Renelle

  • bluray
    Reply

    Everything is very open with a really clear explanation of the challenges. It was really informative. Your site is useful. Many thanks for sharing! Joline Bondie Dickinson

  • indirmeden
    Reply

    Hello there! This article could not have been written any better! Many thanks for sharing! Angelica Ailbert Meeker

  • turkce
    Reply

    Pretty! This has been an extremely wonderful article. Many thanks for providing this info. Sherri Regan Bertie

  • erotik
    Reply

    Great info it is without doubt. My friend has been awaiting for this tips. Rubetta Dev Bernardo

  • erotik
    Reply

    Hello. splendid job. I did not imagine this. This is a splendid story. Thanks! Pamella Bale Gowrie

  • delta 8
    Reply

    wow, awesome blog article.Thanks Again. Really Cool.

  • john weak
    Reply

    You made several nice points there. I did a search on the topic and found mainly persons will consent with your blog.

  • https://34.87.10.172/
    Reply

    Great article post. Cool.

  • Mammals of Sri Lanka | Ceylon Wild Tours
    Reply

    […] National Park | Sri Lanka Sri Lankan ​Elephants Ecological Zones of Sri […]

  • Hairstyles Men
    Reply

    Hello there! Do you use Twitter? I’d like to follow you if that would be ok. I’m definitely enjoying your blog and look forward to new posts.

  • Fashion Styles
    Reply

    Hello this is kinda of off topic but I was wanting to know if blogs use WYSIWYG editors or if you have to manually code with HTML. I’m starting a blog soon but have no coding expertise so I wanted to get advice from someone with experience. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    • admin
      Reply

      Hi,
      This is not the place to discuss technical matters.
      If you need any help to develop your blog without coding, please write to me – [email protected]

  • Hairstyles
    Reply

    Very good written information. It will be valuable to everyone who employess it, including myself. Keep up the good work – for sure i will check out more posts.

  • манивео лицензия
    Reply

    Keep on working, great job!

  • Hairstyles
    Reply

    Thanks for the a new challenge you have discovered in your text. One thing I’d really like to reply to is that FSBO human relationships are built as time passes. By releasing yourself to the owners the first weekend break their FSBO is definitely announced, before the masses begin calling on Thursday, you develop a good association. By sending them equipment, educational components, free records, and forms, you become a good ally. By taking a personal curiosity about them in addition to their predicament, you generate a solid relationship that, oftentimes, pays off in the event the owners decide to go with an agent they know plus trust — preferably you.

  • Sara
    Reply

    Great post. I was checking continuously this blog and I am impressed!

    Very helpful info particularly the last part 🙂 I care for such info much.
    I was seeking this certain information for a very long time.
    Thank you and good luck.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Translate »

Sign In

Register

Reset Password

Please enter your username or email address, you will receive a link to create a new password via email.